Category: Harmon Killebrew

July 27, 2020

Twins’ ‘bomba’ squad is alive and well

During the 2019 season, the Twins earned the nickname “bomba” — Spanish for bomb — for the record number of home runs the team hit. In case you’ve forgotten, it was 307 home runs, a new single-season record. And after Sunday’s beat down of the Chicago White Sox, it’s clear the bomba squad is alive,... Continue Reading »

July 18, 2020

The year the Boston Red Sox had no answer, and I mean no answer, for the Minnesota Twins

After Ted Williams retired, and before Carl Yastrzemski rose to prominence, the Boston Red Sox were not very good. They lost often during the early 1960s and finally hit bottom with 100 losses in 1965, including to the Twins, who pushed them around in 17 of 18 meetings that season. That’s right: the Twins were... Continue Reading »

July 14, 2020

A tale of two seasons, featuring the Twins and Blue Jays

The Twins were barely competitive in 1979, finishing the season with a record of 82-80. It also was manager Gene Mauch’s final full season with the club, and star infielder, Rod Carew, who hit .388 in 1977, was no longer with the Twins after he was traded during the offseason. His departure was almost a... Continue Reading »

July 2, 2020

Twins baseball is back. Finally.

I’m not positive that major league baseball and its players truly settled their COVID-19 differences, but no matter: baseball is back. Summer training begins soon, followed by a 60-game season that gets underway later this month. At first glance, the shorter and geographically condensed season would appear to work in the Twins favor. Or does... Continue Reading »

June 15, 2020

The day the Twins became the first AL team to hit 5 home runs in an inning

A season after the Twins went to the World Series in 1965, they got off to a slow start and played mostly .500 ball. But there were signs the second half of the season might be different, particularly on June 9, 1966, when the Twins hosted the Kansas City A’s before only 9,600 fans. Curveballer... Continue Reading »

May 23, 2020

About Ron Davis, one more time

In our slower, baseball-less world, except in South Korea, of course, I found myself staring at Twitter when a tweet popped up about a horrible Twins loss on May 13, 1985. Where did this happen? Where else? The Bronx, the site of so much Twins agony. On that spring night at Yankee Stadium, the Twins... Continue Reading »

March 30, 2020

The day Camilo Pascual struck out 15 on opening day, 1960

A season before the Washington Senators picked up stakes and moved to Minnesota, the Washington team kicked off its final season in D.C. in style, courtesy of a 26-year-old Cuban curveballer named, Camilo Pascual. Pascual’s pitching that day was good enough for inclusion on Baseball-Reference.com’s top opening day pitching performances. He won 17 games the... Continue Reading »

March 2, 2020

It’s Twins/Yankees again, folks (my favorite obsession)

Amid the business of spring training — lineups with lots of new faces and veterans slowly working their way back from the offseason — a tweet caught my eye. Yankee Stadium, 1967, a few short year before it would be totally reconfigured (1974-75). #Yankees pic.twitter.com/QYpxwdpiuS — MLBcathedrals (@MLBcathedrals) February 27, 2020 This time it was... Continue Reading »

February 17, 2020

Under new playoff proposal, would the Twins ever pick the Yankees and would the Yanks always pick the Twins?

Major League Baseball has pitched a new playoff proposal for the 2022 season and beyond, a plan that was unveiled this month and landed with an overwhelming thud. Many, I think, are supportive of expanding playoff opportunities to more teams, but a nationally televised seeding process where teams would pick who they play? That would... Continue Reading »

Hi, I’m Rolf Boone, Twins fan.

I became a fan of the Minnesota Twins after a friendly wager in the early 1980s. I survived Ron Davis, the meltdown in Cleveland, Phil Bradley at the Kingdome and then marveled at a rising generation of stars and two World Series wins in 1987 and 1991. Brad Radke made the 1990s bearable, while Kirby Puckett’s eye injury, exit from the game and eventual death made it almost too much to bear. The new century ushered in more talent — Joe Mauer, Johan Santana, Joe Nathan, Torii Hunter, Justin Morneau — and consecutive seasons of playoff baseball, followed by consecutive seasons of losing baseball. A winning season returned in 2015. So here we are. Go Twins.